Mushi-diary

Mushi-diary

osamu tsukamotoosamu tsukamoto

01...> In the garden of Derek German in Dungeness, Kent, England.
Brachytheciums grow around a red fleshy plant.

02...> In my garden in Kurashiki. Also a moss belonging to the Brachytheciaceae family. Makes me sort of happy.

My Hobby is Observing Moss Plants

“My favorite pastime is observing moss plants.”This phrase is often met by dubious expressions. Since there is usually no particular reason for liking, for example, a dandelion better than a rose, I simply prefer moss plants to flowers. Moss plants, from a distance, do not appear three-dimensional. They actually have stems and leaves (although the distinction is not clear in some cases). Moreover, it is difficult to tell one moss plant apart from another. There are 20,000 species worldwide, with 2,000 here in Japan alone. By taking a careful look at a moss plant growing on a roadside you will usually find two to three species growing together. Telling them apart like,“This one here is Brachymenium exile.”and“That is Bryum argenteum.”is what I like to do. It certainly is a solitary activity. There is such diversity in just a bit of soil, imagining what to expect on my property excites me. Around the paving stone in the yard, on the trunk and around the base of a garden tree, inside a planter, on the brick wall between my house and my neighbor…that should probably allow me to easily count over 10 kinds of moss plants. A closer look through a loupe introduces you to a breathtakingly beautiful and delicate world. A forest of moss plants of various color and shape. A microscopic world that temporarily relieves your mind of your size and weight. I have never left Kurashiki since I was born, and spent years after years walking the same road to my kindergarten, elementary school, and to Mushi Bunko. Discovering the small universe that exists around me has sort of expanded my perception of Kurashiki all the better. I consider my favorite pastime to be of rather good taste.